Overlay Program Includes Low-cost Bike Lanes

After wrapping up major repaving work on Richards Road left over from last year, the 2018 overlay program is underway in earnest, bringing new asphalt, new bike lanes and new curb ramps.

Work has begun in the Eastgate, Newport and Hilltop neighborhoods; areas targeted for improvements this year are clustered in south and east Bellevue. Work includes:

  • Repaving: This year, approximately 30 lane miles of roadway at 40 locations will be resurfaced. The contract for this year’s overlay improvements totals $6.4 million. Work will continue as long as weather permits or until all the improvements are completed.
  • Bike lanes: Work will include 4.6 miles of improvements to the city’s bicycle network, such as: new, simple bike lanes; enhanced, or “separated” bike lanes; and new pavement markings, called “sharrows.” The enhancements are partially funded by the 2016 Neighborhood Safety, Connectivity and Congestion Levy. It’s anticipated a total of 19 miles of bike lanes will be added citywide in 2018 through a variety of funding sources.
  • Curb ramps: Crews will add or replace 54 curb ramps to improve mobility for people with disabilities.

Prior to beginning overlay work in a neighborhood, crews set up “No Parking” signs. On more heavily traveled streets, electronic message signs will be used to alert drivers about upcoming impacts. During the overlay, workers grind down and remove a layer of old asphalt so new pavement will match the concrete curb and gutter. Next, a paving machine lays down two inches of new asphalt followed by a heavy roller that presses the asphalt into place.

The Overlay program includes a list of 2018 repaving project locations, along with a project map. Information on traffic impacts is available in the city’s Traffic Advisories and Real Time Bellevue Traffic map. For more specific information, contact Teresa Becker, pavement manager, at 425-452-7942 or tbecker@bellevuewa.gov. 

Now in its 32nd year, Bellevue’s overlay program focuses on resurfacing a portion of city streets annually. This strategy avoids the need for a complete roadway replacement, which can cost up to five times more than an overlay. Since 1990, more than 780 lane miles of roadway have been repaired or resurfaced as part of the program. Across the city, there are approximately 1,100 lane miles of asphalt roads.

Published on 07/10/2018